Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

36 Things to Do with Candy Corn Slideshow

36 Things to Do with Candy Corn Slideshow

Candy Corn Cupcakes

With the cupcake trend still, somehow, alive, these unique and visually appealing cupcakes will make for a sweet sendoff to a Halloween party, especially for kids.

Candy Corn Popcorn

Here’s a great favor idea: send your guests home with a tricolor popcorn mix to keep their snacking cravings satisfied.

Candy Corn Candy

Lollipops, marshmallow pops, sugar candy — oh, my! Create a whole candy bar filled with candy-corn themed treats at your next soirée.

Candy Corn Trick-or-Treat Bags

Set the tone for this year with a scene-setting trick-or-treat bag — a candy corn!

The ultimate costume for a newborn or toddler — just make sure that you remind friends and family that they’re not edible, even though they look so delicious.

Candy Corn Costume

The ultimate costume for a newborn or toddler — just make sure that you remind friends and family that they’re not edible, even though they look so deliciously adorable.

Candy Corn Vodka

Take a childhood favorite and turn it into something your adult pals can enjoy.

Candy Corn Push Pop

Create a unique party favor by filling a push pop with candy corn and other festive treats.

Candy Corn Candle Décor

Create a table setting like no other by simply setting a candle in a vase full of candy corn.

Candy Corn Candy Bars

Candy corn and candy bars — the best of both worlds if you ask us.

Candy Corn Macarons

As macarons are all the rage, toss out the usual raspberry, lavender, and pistachio flavors and replace them with a Halloween-themed one to make your party both festive and chic.

Candy Corn Garland

As you would with popcorn, string candy corn to set the scene in your home. It will make for a fun activity for your kids.

Candy Corn Pom Poms

Pom poms being a tremendous trend in DIY event planning, so why not take the concept and make it festive? Create candy-corn themed poms for a Halloween party or a fall dinner.

Candy Corn Pumpkins

Skip the carving, and instead paint your pumpkins white, orange, and yellow in honor of the Halloween treat.

Candy Corn Parfait

Hosting a Halloween breakfast? Start the day right with this parfait recipe.

Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Add cookies to your decorative table of desserts. While these are simple sugar cookies, there are tons of other candy-corn-filled recipes on Pinterest.

Candy Corn Pizza

Kids will go crazy for these slices! The pizza is in the same hue as the fall candy, so kids will think they're getting dessert for dinner. For more Halloween-themed kids menus head here.

Candy Corn Meringues

Perfect for an afternoon tea, these meringues will really make a statement

Candy Corn Bark

Give these as gifts to teachers or co-workers in honor of the holiday.

Candy Corn Cheesecake

After a harvest dinner, guests will ooh and aah over this color-coded cake.

Candy Corn Waffles

Pair this with the parfait for a sweet start to Halloween.

Candy Corn Manicure

Add this manicure to your costume for the perfect finishing touch!

Candy Corn Vase

Create a floral arrangement in one vase and sit it inside another filled with candy corn for a centerpiece that will surely stand out.

Candy Corn Topiary

Perfect as a gift or as a centerpiece, this candy-filled tree will make guests really feel the Halloween theme.

Candy Corn Snack Mix

Add this snack mix to your kids' lunch bag for a sweet and festive treat during the school week.

Candy Corn Rice Krispy Treats

Kids will celebrate Halloween at school with their annual Halloween party. Send this treat in so your children can enjoy with their friends.

Candy Corn Pretzels

A perfect snack for guests to eat while exiting your bash, this candy-colored pretzel mix makes for an ideal party favor.

Candy Corn Martini

No olives here, just the sweet stuff. Make this a signature drink at your costume party.

Candy Corn Butterfinger

Peanut butter candy heaven. Blend the two beloved flavors and create a candy you won’t forget.

Candy Corn Jell-O Shots

Yep, candy corn just went there.

Candy Corn Ice Cream

Stack up your favorite flavors with this recipe to make a decadent dessert that will really set the bar for your guests.

Candy Corn Madeleines

Wow your friends at your Halloween cookie swap with these candy corn madeleines.

Candy Corn Fruit Salad

Your Halloween breakfast is now complete with this fruit salad fit for the holiday.

Candy Corn Door Hanger

Set the scene indoors or outdoors with this inviting candy-themed door hanger.

Candy Corn Peppermint Patties

Get your pals ready for the upcoming holidays by blending the flavor of Christmas with Halloween.

Candy Corn Wreath

Nothing says "Welcome to our Home" better during this time of year than a tricolor wreath. When the trick-or-treaters come knocking, they’ll know that visiting your house means they’ll get the good stuff.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Candy Corn Sugar Cookies

Just so you know I, like Kate, had very good intentions of posting actual food today. But there’s only so much time before Halloween and then we can’t post fun things like this for a whole year, so you see we must! And actually, you can do candy corn themed stuff all the way through Thanksgiving, so live it up! But I do have an actual dinner recipe on Monday. For real. It’s done. Photographed. And it even involves vegetables (remember those?) So stay tuned. Until then, prepare yourselves for Halloween cuteness overload. I’ve been making these for a long time and I’ve noticed them popping up on blogs everywhere the past few Halloweens, so I thought we’d jump on the bandwagon. Because they’re just too, too cute. And lots of too, too cute cookies take some artistic talent and a big chunk of time to complete, but these are actually quick and easy! There’s no rolling involved and you don’t even need a cookie cutter. SO easy.

Start with a batch of sugar cookies and divide your dough into three equal portions. Since these aren’t going to be slathered in frosting, I add extra extract to my dough, like double vanilla and some almond too. I actually tried a new dough recipe that I loved and I’ll tell you more about later. I think this would be so cute and yummy with shortbread too.

You’ll leave one of those portions as is (this will be the white part of the candy corn) and then you’ll color one of the remaining portions yellow and one orange. I always recommend using gel or paste food coloring, but you could use liquid as well. Wilton brand gel color is pretty easily accessible grab it off Amazon, or you can find it at craft stores like Michaels.

And here’s a little tip. When you’re coloring multiple things in a recipe, start from lightest to darkest and then you won’t have to wash everything in between. In this case, do your yellow first, because a tiny bit of yellow mixed into the orange batch you’ll do after won’t make any difference, but if you get orange in your yellow it could ruin the yellow. Make sense?

Now you’ll just need a loaf pan. Any size works, exactness isn’t important here, you can fudge around like you’ll see I did in a minute. But if you have an option between a larger and a smaller pan, you might want the smaller one. Just grab a big piece of plastic wrap and place it in the pan.

The first thing you’ll do is place your uncolored cookie dough in the bottom of the pan and spread it out as flat as you can. It helps to lay a sheet of plastic over the dough and smooth it over with your fingers. Remove the plastic and then add the layer of orange dough and repeat.

You’re going to have 3 layers here and the height of your dough will determine the size of your cookies. In my case, I made a small batch of cookie dough, and if I spread it out all the way in my large loaf pan each layer would be so thin that it would produce teeny tiny cookies. So that’s why you’ll notice I didn’t spread my dough to the very end. Shoot for about 3/4 inch per layer at least. You can always make larger cookies if desired.

Finally place your last layer of dough on top, you can see here how I use the plastic to smooth it, which gets it nice and flat.

After the top layer, just wrap the plastic all the way around the dough and place the pan in the refrigerator for a few hours, or the freezer for about 30-60 minutes. You’ll want this very chilled, all the way through so it cuts nice and smooth.

When it’s done chilling, unwrap and you should have a nice layered loaf of dough.

Now slice that loaf into about 1/4-inch slices, working a few at at time.

To make my cookies look nicer, I use a sharp knife and make a nice clean cut across the uneven top.

Now just slice your rectangle into triangle pieces. See? Magical candy corn! You’ll have some “scrap” pieces of dough from the ends of your rectangle and the top sliver you trimmed off. Bake those up too, they still taste great!

Pop them on your baking sheet

And if you want, you can sprinkle them with sugar, or coarse sprinkles.

And just bake according to your sugar cookie recipe.

I like the ones with sugar the best because they look sort of sparkly.

Another fun thing you can do is dip the ends in almond bark or white chocolate. Sometimes I just dip the white part (which will be on the top of some cookies and on the bottom of others) and then cover it with white sprinkles. This isn’t complicated, and it really is fast to do if you want to dress them up a little.

They’re also cute with just the tippy tops dipped. I found those orange, yellow, and white sprinkles at Target.


Watch the video: Fully Unwrapped - Candy Corn (January 2022).